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News:  Young Investigators Celebrated In Philadelphia

The Young Investigator Awards recognize outstanding research by researchers who are completing or have recently completed their PhD degrees. The recent DIC symposium “DIC Young Investigator Awardees: Where Are They Now?” held at the ACS National Meeting in Philadelphia clearly demonstrated that the YIA winners go on to become true leaders in inorganic chemistry and related fields. In 2016, the division recognized 7 young investigators with this prestigious award:

1. Dr. Carl Brozek obtained his PhD from MIT under supervision of Prof. Mircea Dincă. During his graduate work, Carl established cation exchange in metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) as a tremendously versatile synthetic method that takes away the serendipity normally associated with MOF synthesis. He was able to synthesize MOFs with the most unusual metal centers that otherwise would never be amenable to solvothermal conditions, e.g., Ti3+ and V2+. Carl is currently pursuing his postdoctoral studies at University of Washington.

2. Julia-Anna Dolyniuk is completing her PhD studies in the group of Prof. Kirill Kovnir at UC Davis. Julia-Anna’s project focuses on the discovery of new bulk thermoelectric materials based on extended cage frameworks (clathrates). Her approach is unique in exploring the bounds of new transition metal-pnicogen clathrates where the inclusion of a large number of transition metals in the framework leads to enhanced electrical conductivities, while the guest ions trapped in the voids of the framework “rattle” to maintain low thermal conductivities—an ideal combination for thermoelectrics.

3. Dr. Dawei Feng, who is currently a postdoc at Stanford, carried out his PhD studies with Prof. Hong-Cai Zhou at Texas A&M. In his PhD work, Dawei discovered MOFs with exceptional stability. Some of these materials exhibit extraordinary stability in water and aqueous solutions with a wide range of pH values, which makes them very attractive for further commercial applications. Some of the ultrastable MOFs developed by Dawei also act as biomimetic catalysts.

4. Dr. Jarad Mason, currently a postdoc at Northwestern, completed his PhD studies in the group of Prof. Jeffrey Long at UC Berkeley, where he investigated the use of MOFs for the capture of CO2 from multicomponent mixtures. Jarad demonstrated that only amine-appended adsorbents retain a high CO2 adsorption capacity in the presence of water. He also developed a powerful new concept for gas storage, where a pressure-induced structural change in the flexible MOFs is used to achieve a dramatic improvement in the gas capture capacity.

5. Dr. Heather Neu obtained her PhD from Johns Hopkins under direction of Prof. David Goldberg. Heather’s PhD research led to the fundamental discovery that there is the potential for a profound influence of the axial ligand on highvalent metal-oxo species in two-electron oxygen-atom transfer processes. She also demonstrated the light-driven, proton-controlled catalytic aerobic oxidation of C-H bonds with a MnIII porphyrinoid complex, reavealing a completely new method for the catalytic oxidation of benzylic C-H bonds with O2 (or air) as the oxidant. Heather is currently a postdoc at University of Maryland.

6. Dr. Alexandra Velian, currently a postdoc at Columbia University, performed her PhD work in the labs of Prof. Kit Cummins at MIT. Alexandra’s research on the chemistry of precursors to the P2 molecule led to a discovery of an unprecedented “click reaction” resulting in the all-inorganic aromatic ion [P2N3]. This finding was preceded by the shrewd discovery that 7-phosphadibenzonorbornadiene molecules can be obtained in a single step from magnesium anthracene upon treatment with dichlorophosphines, to provide a family of precursors to singlet phosphinidene reactive intermediates.

7. Dr. Shiyu Zhang received his PhD from Georgetown University under supervision of Prof. Timothy Warren. Shiyu’s PhD research addressed challenging questions in copper / nitric oxide biology. By carefully investigating the reaction between NO and Cu thiolates, he demonstrated  reversible binding that takes place via insertion into the Cu-S bond, a new paradigm for reversible NO binding in bioinorganic chemistry. Further developing this chemistry, he discovered the first example of binuclear bonding of the N2 molecule to a copper coordination compound. Shiyu is currently a postdoc at MIT.

 

News:  A 12.500€ Award for Young Scientists in Energy Storage!

Prof. Jean-Marie Tarascon, director of the French network on electrochemical energy storage (a network of 17 laboratories and 15 industrials aiming at battery and supercondensators breakthrough and tech transfer) is announcing the second edition of the YESS award (Young Energy Storage Scientist award).

The YESS Award 2016 is aimed at young innovative scientists from the electrochemical energy storage field. The prize money is of €10.000 for the winner, €2.500 for the runner up (free of use). The winner will be also invited to the Batteries 2016 congress where the prize ceremony will take place. The award is open to scientists of at most 35 years-old with at least a master’s degree. They can be US, European or Canadian nationals. They can submit their project until July 27th 

Detailed conditions + application form are available on http://www.bit.ly/29ikK11

If you have any question please send an email to clement.colin@energie-rs2e.com

News:  Inorganic Nanoscience Award to Raymond Schaak

Raymond E. Schaak, the DuPont Professor of Materials Chemistry at the Pennsylvania State University and an Associate Editor at ACS Nano, is the winner of the 2016 Inorganic Nanoscience Award, presented by the ACS Division of Inorganic Chemistry to honor excellence in research. The award is sponsored by the NanoCenter at the University of South Carolina.

Professor Schaak is well-known for his creative work in synthetic inorganic nanochemistry. His work provides new paradigms for the design and synthesis of complex inorganic nanostructures by employing the concept of retrosynthetic design, which historically has been limited to molecular systems. This is coupled with the concept of colloids as “artificial molecules” to provide a total synthetic framework toward inorganic nanomaterials. Target materials are finding applications in catalysis and energy conversion and storage.

Representative manuscripts include:

C.G. Read, T.R. Gordon, J.M. Hodges, R.E. Schaak, “Colloidal Hybrid Nanoparticle Insertion Reaction for Transforming Heterodimers into Heterotrimers,” J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2015, 137, 12517-12517. DOI: 10.1021/jacs.5b08850

E.J. Popczun, C.G. Read, C.W. Roske, N.S. Lewis, R.E. Schaak, “Highly active electrocatalysis of the hydrogen evolution reaction by cobalt phosphide nanoparticles,” Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 5427-5430.  DOI: 10.1002/anie.201402646

M.R. Buck and R.E. Schaak, “Emerging Strategies for the Total Synthesis of Inorganic Nanostructures,” Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2013, 52, 6154-6178.  DOI: 10.1002/anie.201207240

Schaak will receive the award, which consists of a plaque and $3,000, at the ACS national meeting in Philadelphia in August.

News: Prof. Dr. Serena DeBeer Wins 2016 Inorganic Chemistry Lectureship Award

 

The Division of Inorganic Chemistry represents a diverse body of scientists who come together to understand and promote the richness of the chemistry of the elements. Molecular biologists, materials scientists, and many types of chemists are members of this division. Due to the diversity of interests among our members, four subdivisions are available for membership in addition to the general membership in the Division.

The Division has several responsibilities: the development and coordination of programming of interest to our members at national meerings; continuing improvement in the education of current and future chemists in the beauty of inorganic chemistry and the value of chemistry in general; representation of our members’ interests to the ACS through the election of Councilors and other positions; and maintaining the fiscal health of the Division to support all other activities. The Division usually has one of the largest technical programs at the national meetings.

The goals of the ACS Division of Inorganic Chemistry

  1. To advance the science of Inorganic Chemistry.
  2. To provide an organization within which close contact among chemists interested in Inorganic Chemistry can be maintained.
  3. To arrange programs dealing with Inorganic Chemistry for the National Meetings of the ACS.
  4. To organize and conduct symposia on special topics in Inorganic Chemistry at times and places designated by the Executive Committee of the DIC.
  5. To promote the teaching of Inorganic Chemistry at both the undergraduate and graduate levels.

Areas of chemistry in which the Division’s activities are focused:

  1. Organometallic Chemistry. Includes the synthesis, characterization, and reactivity of main group, transition metal, and rare earth organometallic compounds, and the applications of such compounds in organic synthesis, inorganic synthesis, and catalysis.
  2. Bioinorganic Chemistry. Includes all aspects of the chemistry of the metallic elements and small inorganic molecules in biological systems.
  3. Solid-State and Materials Chemistry. Includes the synthesis, characterization, and physical and chemical properties of solids that contain metallic and/or main group elements.
  4. Coordination Chemistry. Includes the synthesis, characterization, and physical and chemical properties of classical coordination compounds.
  5. Nanoscience. Includes the synthesis, characterization, and physical and chemical properties of nanostructured materials (inorganic nanocrystals, inorganic-organic hybrid materials etc.).

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 History of the founding of the Division of Inorganic Chemistry

See:  A History of the Division of Inorganic Chemistry, American Chemical Society by John C. Bailar, Jr. in Journal of Chemical Education, volume 66, number 7, July 1989, pages 537-545 (DOI: 10.1021/ed066p537).

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